Contact and appointments

Please contact us on the following phone number with any questions or to make an appointment:

 

+44 (0)1626 331 725

 

Please also use our contact form.

News

Blog

Featuring posts that relate to different apects of the psychology of work.  You are welcome to join and make your voice heard.

 

http://prismsustainableworkplace.ning.com/

 

 

Twitter and Linkedin

Find us also on twitter https://twitter.com/#!/thebritishpsych

 

and Linkedin http://uk.linkedin.com/pub/craig-knight/4/438/9b9

 

 

3 minute video outlining how to develop an effective (or an appalling) office

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IfapCq6Wu8s

 

Our history

IDR grew from a PhD research group at the University of Exeter. Established in 2004, we began as mix of business, government and academia. Today IDR is a commercial business that retains strong academic influence and connections.  Our aim has always been to provide industry with quantifiable evidence of good and bad practice in organizational design and management.

 

Using peer reviewed, published science we have uncovered robust powerful and consistent evidence (some of which is shown on this website) highlighting:

 

1: The utterly toxic and profit reducing nature of spartan, controlled environments such as those espoused by lean and six sigma philosopies.  Since 2004 these environments have produced -- without exception -- the worst results in terms of productivity and well-being. 

 

2: How high design environments qualitatively and quantitatively improve both well-being and productivity but not to the optimal levels claimed by their proponents.

 

3: The crucial role management plays in the success or otherwise of the business environment.  Most management principles would seem to degrade rather than enhance productivity.

 

4: How psychological comfort is far more important than product finish, quality and design.

 

5: How the formation of identities within workgroups -- and how those workgroups subsequently identify with the business -- can make or break an organization. 

 

Reading

Brown, R., Eller, A., Leeds, S.,& Stace, K. (2006). Intergroup contact and intergroup attitudes: a longitudinal study. European Journal of Social Psychology, 37, 692-703.